How to Help Your People Improve

There is a lot on your plate. What happens on a daily basis at home, combined with the ever-evolving experience at work, can be a lot to manage. Take a look at work, specifically. The general description “work” has become more complicated and complex; few days at work are the same as the day before.

So, how can you keep your employees engaged and performing at a high level? Through skill development. Having the best skills enables an employee to be more engaged, more efficient and more effective. In my experience, the best way to build education and learning into an already busy workday is through active learning.

Consider these three ways to bring active learning into each of your employees’ days.

  1. Create learning expectations. Add learning a skill, habit or other performance improvement idea to each employee’s weekly to-do list. Have a weekly check in on things done and things learned. This does two critical things. First, it creates valuable manager-employee relationship time and second, it draws attention to the urgency, need and importance of continual learning. This makes learning a cultural value.
  2. Create teachable moments. In every moment, there is always something to learn. Think and act as a coach who uses interactions to ask key questions to help others think, consider, reflect and respond. Consider questions like, “What is another way to handle this?” Or, “What did this situation tell you about your abilities, about our culture, about our customers, about working effectively with others, etc?” Or, “What could you do to make this better?” Stopping for a moment to draw attention to or focus on a situation can help everyone learn from the moment.
  3. Connect your people with internal mentors. Mentoring is the process of accelerating learning where a person with greater skills shares what they know with those who have lesser skills. Identify the skills the workplace needs and those on the team with these skills. Create the opportunity for a mentor to share what they know and feel is valuable and important. When done well and with intention, it leads to a wiser, more able and more connected team.

According to the Gallup Organization, today’s employees want to grow, learn and develop because they are aware that those with the best skills have the best opportunities. This benefits the organization because employees with great skills are more engaged which helps them be more efficient and effective. A true win for both employee and organization.

Take Action
Develop a cohesive active learning plan for each of your employees by defining their success and challenging skill areas. Be clear of the existing skills each employee can further develop, as well as the skills they each need help developing. Use this information to identify your skill mentors to make learning and performance improvement the responsibility of everyone in the organization. Not only does the organization become wiser, but employees build stronger performance relationships with each other.

By Jay Forte

Consider reading 3 Ways to Get Your Employees to Want to Do More

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You Know You’re a Great Leader When You Do These Things

In the industrial age, we prided our leaders on being direct, assertive and knowing all the answers. We needed them to be a strong central figure to help direct and orchestrate work, manage people and make things happen. When the workplace remained fairly static in what work was and how it was done, it was not only easier to accomplish, but also praised and, to an extent, appreciated.

But then the workplace changed. Much of the make-things economy moved offshore, leaving us with today’s provide-service workplace. Every employee has the opportunity to directly interact with customers. This, combined with the fact that few workplace situations are the same day-to-day, changes not only what we do for work, but also how we work and how we lead those who work.

As a result, today’s workplace needs a new type of leader, one who is a good listener but also able to take charge. One who earns respect and loyalty from their employees and still drives results. One who can admit to not knowing everything, or to admit when they’re wrong, and use the wisdom of others to make wise, sound decisions.

To be an effective leader in today’s workplace, four attributes are required:

1. Today’s best leaders are humble. They are aware that they don’t know everything and are firm believers in the mantra, “none of us is as smart as all of us.” They facilitate open discussions and dialog to gather information to be able to fully understand situations, aware that they are no longer expected to have all the answers. Instead, their role is to direct their employees in how to find, gather or create the information. They leave their ego at the door, allowing them to more confidently connect and interact with anyone in or out of the business. They are more interested in having things done well and done right than being the one to have the answer. They know their role is to facilitate the creation and implementation of the best ideas.

2. Today’s best leaders are curious. Great leaders are masters at asking questions. They are interested in knowing what others think, consider, do and want. They know that the responses provide meaningful information that will help them make wise and more successful decisions. They have trained themselves to stop telling and do more asking. This approach has a significant impact on those around them. Others feel engaged, encouraged and empowered to share, think and contribute.

3. Today’s best leaders care deeply about their people. They know that despite the critical role the performance numbers play, the way to achieve results is through their people. They build honest, authentic and caring relationships not just to get their people to do things, but because they truly care about everyone in their organization. It is obvious when a leader truly cares vs. cares to get a result. Caring leaders inspire employee loyalty.

4. Today’s best leaders commit to helping everyone grow, learn and improve. In a world that constantly changes, those with the best skills have the best ability to contribute and build sustainable careers. Today’s leaders have expectations of their people to constantly look at their work and lives and ask the question, “what could I do to make this better?” This focus on gradual and continual improvement helps their people discover, develop and live their potential, leading to more engaged and successful employees, and an improved organization.

Take Action
As the world and workplace changes, so do the attributes of effective leaders. Stay tuned in, focused and aware of the changes to modify your style to stay effective and relevant. Your people expect it. Your organization relies on it. Your customers depend on it.

Original article appeared on The Ladders, October 7, 2019.

By Jay Forte

Consider reading 3 Things Every Manager Can Do to Increase Employee Engagement

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Actions vs. Words

In today’s society, false promises seem to be the norm. These generate feelings of distrust, dislike and lack of commitment. It reminds me a bit of the story of The Boy Who Cried Wolf. Everyone knows the story – a little boy lies to get attention and does it so frequently without remorse that when the time comes that help is truly needed, no one shows up to help him.

We use this story to teach the value of telling the truth, yet our leaders seem to have forgotten this fable. How many of us can recall a time when one of our leaders – whether at work, in our government or in life – have made empty or false promises? Have demanded specific actions within a seemingly unrealistic timeframe when they weren’t really needed?

I believe it’s the persistent actions of our leaders who consistently say one thing and do something else that lead to such a strong rate of disengagement and distrust. In fact, one of the data points we frequently share from the Gallup Organization is that 70% of the workforce is disengaged – and that number has not shifted much in the more than 20 years the Gallup Organization has been gathering data for their State of the American Workforce Report.

Yikes.

So what now? I think our leaders need to revisit the stories and fables of childhood (timeless wisdom) to learn the importance of speaking the truth, to remember that actions often speak louder than words, and, perhaps most importantly, to hold themselves and others accountable for their actions and their words. There are three areas where I believe this can – and should – start:

  • Transparency – Be open about why certain requests are being made or why deadlines exist. People are likely more willing to help when they are clear on their requirements and expectations, while also understanding why they’re working toward a specific goal. Share meaningful information and ensure clarity.
  • Stopping false or empty promises – Eventually, even your most dedicated employees / followers will start to question your statements, and you’ll see increased rates of disinterest, disengagement and mistrust. How likely are you to follow someone who makes promises that have no basis in reality?
  • Follow-through / commitment – In the same vein as empty promises, don’t make a commitment you can’t or won’t keep. Be honest about what you can and can’t deliver, and follow-through on the promises you make. Be true to your word.

For an updated version of the wisdom of the fables, read The Four Agreements by Don Miguel Ruiz. Truth, honesty and personal accountability are the cornerstones of all relationships.

Think about the leaders in your workplace or the people you consider leaders in your life, whether by title or role. Do they earn this role by their behaviors? What lesson does this share with you? 

Take Action
Consider one small change that can help you shift your behaviors from words to action: make your words actionable. Instead of saying, “this needs to change,” consider saying, “here’s how I’d suggest this changes.” Instead of saying, “something needs to be done,” consider saying, “what if we tried this approach to move this project toward completion?”

A slight change in language not only makes your words actionable, but also starts to hold yourself accountable for the outcome. Try it out. See what changes for you in work and life and how others respond to your shift to action and accountability. You might just inspire them to do the same.

By Kristin Allaben

Consider reading Are You the Great Pretender?

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The Frontline Drives the Bottom Line

The frontline drives the bottom line. Basically, your people are your profits. What do you do to ensure they are aligned, engaged and supported to bring their A-game to the moments of their work days?

During an average year, I speak to thousands of CEOs, mostly about talent, engagement, productivity and performance. I am surprised how many of the organizations are continuing to use outdated approaches with their talent. I find that many leaders continue to have the old mindset that anyone can do any job with the right training. It’s a holdback from our industrial age when, in a skill-based workplace, anyone could learn how to operate a machine.

But today, in our intellectual and service-based workplace, where workplace situations constantly change and require a present, focused and engaged employee, choosing employees wisely and supporting them intentionally is the key to a high-performing frontline.

For every employee to succeed, to feel capable and competent in a role, he or she must be aligned to a role that needs their strengths, abilities and interests. How engaged will your frontline be if they are not good at and interested in what the role does? What level of service will that provide? The lack of engagement due to misalignment will be reflected in employees’ productivity and performance, and in customers’ lack of loyalty.

Does your organization have a process to consistently and successfully hire good-fit employees? By good-fit, I mean employees who not only align to the tasks of the role, but also have the values, beliefs and mission of the organization.

But remember: your work isn’t done once you find that good-fit employee. Well hired employees still want and need to feel supported, valued and cared for. For this to happen, workplace managers need to act more like workplace coaches. Workplace coaches build relationships with their employees to encourage open and honest communication, develop accountability and clarify expectations. They ask, guide and support instead of tell, direct and control. Coaching managers increase the frequency of contact with their employees and use that increased contact to help employees develop skills and abilities. They host recurring feedback conversations with employees that share what’s working and not working in performance so it can be noticed and discussed to either amplify (what’s working) or improve (what’s not working).

Do your managers know how to think and act like coaches to improve the relationship and development of all frontline employees? Consider this: The Gallup Organization shares that the single most important initiative for all organizations is to train the managers how to think and act as coaches.

Take Action
Assess your hiring process. Does it focus on fit, alignment and abilities? What changes do you need to make? Then, assess your support process of your frontline. Does it train and encourage your managers to think and act as coaches to amplify frontline connection and engagement?

Your frontline drives the bottom line. Give it the attention it deserves.

By Jay Forte

Consider reading Don’t Drag Your Feet When Hiring New Talent

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Are You Above or Below the Line?

How do you determine whether a behavior is productive or unproductive? Do you solely consider outcomes or is there more to it? It can be tricky since everyone can interpret this differently. But I came across one of the best ways to learn to assess our behaviors as being productive or unproductive, one I think could be used by anyone in any situation in work or in life. In the book, The 15 Commitments of Conscious Leadership, authors Jim Dethmer, Diana Chapman and Kaley Warner Klemp introduce what they call above-the-line and below-the-line leadership.

Powerful.

When you are open, curious and willing to learn, you create the ability to discuss ideas, brainstorm, consider and expand your opportunities. You increase discussion, dialog and conversation.

  • In the workplace, you engage your employees and help them to feel heard, valued and accountable.
  • At home (above-the-line parenting), you encourage your kids to self-discover, learn and grow.

You create the space for exploration with the intention of considering or finding the best outcomes. You allow both employees and kids to learn how to navigate, think and invent.

When you are closed, defensive and needing to be right, you shut down conversation, limit ideas and shortchange opportunities. You limit your responses to what you know and make the process of solution to be more about personalities and ego than finding optimal solutions. The need to be right overrides the ability to learn in every situation.

Think of what it feels like to work for a below-the-line manager. What level of engagement, performance and loyalty does this inspire in employees? Remember the adage, “people quit people before they quit companies.” Leaders who are below-the-line often chase talent out of the organization, frequently unintentionally; they are unaware of the time they spend below the line. Who wants to work for someone who is closed, defensive and always needing to be right? Is this you?

Think of what it feels like to live with a below-the-line parent. My way or the highway. Discussions are limited. Opportunities to grow into one’s greatest self are restricted. Kids don’t learn who they are but are instead expected to be who their parents say they are. What kind of relationship can you have with a parent who is closed, defensive and needing to be right instead of open, curious and willing to learn?

Which are you?

Take Action
What percentage of the time are you above-the-line? Below-the-line? What situations raise you above or take you below?

Now that you know this, how will you focus on being more open, curious and willing to learn instead of being closed, defensive and needing to be right? And, what could your work and life look like when you make the change?

By Jay Forte

Consider reading Be Clear if you Want Employees to Perform

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This article originally appeared on the Vistage Entrepreneur and Small Business Network on September 18, 2019: https://my.vistage.com/networks/entrepreneurs_and_small_business/blog/2019/09/18/are-you-above-or-below-the-line.

How Your Disengaged Employees Are Impacting Your Customers

Your employees are either building or eroding your brand. Think about their daily interactions with any of your customers. Are they encouraging customers to come back and bring their friends? Or do their actions send customers running and complaining to anyone who will listen?

Either way your brand is affected.

We know that to activate customer loyalty, the organization (and its employees) not only needs to know what customers need and to provide it all the time (this is what drives satisfaction), but to then also choose to do some extras. Ken Blanchard calls it the “+1” in his book Raving Fans. Emeril Lagasse calls it “Bam!” I call it your “Standout!”

Getting it right is great, but doing something more for customers is required to move from satisfaction to loyalty. Both need to happen, every day, all the time.

Here’s the hard question: are your employees delivering this type of customer service to every customer all the time?

Consider this: the Gallup organization shares that nearly 70% of employees are disengaged. This means that nearly 70% of employees do just enough not to get fired, or sometimes do even less.

What does this mean for you? They’re doing just enough with your customers.

Disengaged employees sometimes get it right for your customers. Sometimes. That means that sometimes customers will be satisfied. But satisfied and loyal are two very different things. Disengaged employees will rarely, if ever, consider doing the extras to move a customer to loyal.

Why should you care? Because in our world of intense competition, organizations must know, manage and provide exceptional customer experience in order to grow and succeed. The greater your employee disengagement, the greater the likelihood your customers are receiving average service, which could leave you struggling to achieve your performance goals.

So how can you identify your disengaged employees and start making changes? It starts with greater awareness. Pay attention and notice their performance, effort and response. And ask questions.

Employee surveys are great when used with intention; same with customer satisfaction surveys. But don’t administer them without an action plan in place. These surveys can provide you with valuable information you need to help you make intentional changes to make your workplace better for your employees. And when this is done successfully, it can help deliver a better, more consistent customer service to drive toward loyal customers.

Take Action
There are two critical “experiences” to constantly watch and improve: the employee experience and the customer experience. The employee experience (degree of engagement) drives the customer experience (degree of loyalty). What are you doing on a daily basis to understand where employee engagement levels are and what can improve them?

Remember that employee engagement has the greatest impact on your ability to create a brand that is associated with delivering consistent and exceptional service. This is what ultimately creates a level of customer loyalty where they happily refer you to their friends.

By Jay Forte

Consider reading Don’t Do Average. Make it an Experience

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This article originally appeared on Vistage’s Talent Strategies Network on August 27, 2019: https://my.vistage.com/networks/talent_strategies/blog/2019/08/27/what-your-disengaged-employees-do-to-your-customers.

Three Things to Amp Up the Effectiveness of Your Meetings

Meetings. They fill our days. And let’s be honest: most of them are unproductive or poorly managed. The result is that we waste a lot of time that most of us don’t have available to waste; we are already overcommitted.

Like it or not, meetings will always be part of the workday, so it is critical that you make them effective (they achieve what they should do) and efficient (they do it in as little time as possible). Remember: the value of meetings is what they accomplish or inspire, not just the act of meeting.

In my more than 20 years of coaching, consulting and working to amplify performance, I’ve discovered three things you can do to amp up the effectiveness of your meetings. 

1. Make it Personal. Meetings are more effective when those attending can relate to each other. For that, we need to remember that we are each human. So consider starting each meeting with a quick run around the room, asking everyone to share any of the following:

  • What is the best thing that has happened to you today?
  • What is something personal that you want us to know about?
  • What is a success or achievement that you are proud of?
  • What is something that we would never have guessed about you?

When we share our humanity, we connect at a deeper level, which encourages greater sharing of ideas, less apprehension to contribute and, therefore, more productive meetings. Connecting personally builds a stronger bond than just meeting to solve problems, discuss ideas or share information.

Devise a bank of questions you can open your meeting with to help those involved see their shared humanity.

2. Define the objectives and expectations. According to Habit #2 in Stephen Covey’s book, The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, “begin with the end with mind.” With clarity of a direction, goal, objective or expectation, the meeting can police itself to stay focused. Without this clarity, a meeting can run in all directions, distracting the participants and wasting time.

I call this defining the goalpost. Ask yourself: what will we have to achieve to make this a successful meeting? Define it. Share it. Hold all meeting attendees to its achievement.

3. Use an agenda to stay on task. This might seem like a no brainer, but some of the most ineffective meetings are often the result of running with an unclear agenda, or no agenda at all. Even with clear objectives, meetings can wander because of the diversity of the meeting members. Use an agenda to stay focused on what matters and to stay committed to the time allotted to each topic. And ensure your meeting has a time or agenda manager, someone who keeps everyone accountable for their time, contribution and ensuring the meeting continues to move forward.

Nobody has unlimited time; it’s why seeing your calendar fill up with meeting after meeting can be so frustrating. So, make the time to define the topics that need to be covered, understand the time required to adequately discuss each topic and identify the goal(s) of the meeting. This creates the ability to use time wisely and to ensure the meeting attendees to stay focused.

I never attend a meeting I don’t have an agenda for. An agenda is not only a time saver, but it also helps me know how to prepare, how much time I will need to provide and what the meeting will accomplish. With this information, I can be effective in supporting it and making good use of my and the meeting’s time.

Take Action
Before you attend your next meeting, insist on knowing the objective or goal of the meeting and see the agenda. Then, once in the meeting, be sure to first make it personal and be committed to living to the focus and time define in the agenda.

Meetings are truly an invaluable tool when they are organized and run correctly. They can be the place where great things happen, or they can be an abject waste of time. Take control of them to get them to deliver great things for you and your organization.

By Jay Forte

Consider reading Managers: How to Identify and Correct Your Blind Spots

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The Power of Collaborative and Collective Genius

I recently worked with a client who struggled with several difficult and challenging problems. The CEO of this organization confided that not being able to solve this particular situation was stressful and frustrating.

As a coach, my core belief is that each of us is extremely capable, though most people don’t come close to accessing or using their potential. This is due partly to the fact that we don’t know how capable we are, and we are not regularly asked to bring our best ideas to the challenges we face, particularly in the workplace.

So, I brought this question to my client for consideration. A group of the organization’s employees were working through a mindful problem-solving skill training program, a perfect time to activate their thinking and have them use what they were learning to fully understand the challenge the CEO and organization were facing and then brainstorm possible solutions. They were not to solve; instead they were to help the CEO out by using their diverse perspectives and share their best ideas.

The goal of this was for the organization to learn how to better engage the collaborative and collective genius of others to see, consider and brainstorm – to expand what they consider before they choose and act. It was to give them permission to consider moving past the conventional and recurrent ideas to ones that were wiser and more sustainable.

It worked. A solution came from the greater number of ideas generated.

To activate your teams’ collaborative and collective genius, consider the following.

  • During the job candidate interview process, test and assess your potential future employees’ ability to think creatively and critically. Though these are skills, many people have not learned or developed them. Ensure all who join your organization are able to play big with ideas to contribute and encourage the contributions of others.
  • Create a workplace culture that requires all employees to contribute ideas to improve the organization. Don’t exclude any role in the organization from collaborating and contributing. Each employee has a great number of life’s experiences that inspire ideas. The “best ideas” are not exclusive to managerial or leader roles. Your front-line employees have ideas and perspectives that may be just the solution needed.
  • Applaud ideas, not just solutions. Most workplace cultures value solutions more than ideas and critical thinking. The result is that most organizations don’t give themselves enough ideas from which to choose the best. Remember the adage, “To have a great idea, you first have to have a lot of ideas.” Encourage ideas to be able to create solutions.

There is great truth in the expression, “None of us is as smart as all of us.” The role of manager, leader or CEO does not make you smarter than the rest. Rather, the smart managers, leaders and CEOs constantly source ideas, information and perspectives from everyone in the organization. Use the genius of your workforce to be adaptable and resilient in today’s workplace.

Take Action
What project, issue or challenge would benefit from your organization’s collaborative and collective genius? How will you assemble a team and guide them in how to collaborate to share ideas to help you solve both small and large challenges?

By Jay Forte

Consider reading Pay or Performance – What Really Activates Employee Performance?

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NOTE: The full article appeared on Vistage Florida Speaker Spotlight on August 5, 2019: https://research.vistageflorida.com/the-power-of-collaborative-and-collective-genius

Stop and Notice Works Everywhere

In preparation for the arrival of baby #3, my husband and I have been doing some long overdue household purging. We’re getting rid of things we kept because, at some point in the past, we thought we might need it again. I’m realizing our house is too small for all this stuff AND to safely raise three boys. So, some things have to go.

In the process of going through old boxes, I came across an employee review form from when I was new to management. My scores were good, comments were generally strong and encouraging, but over five pages, there were two negative comments. And those not only stuck with me, but stuck out like a sore thumb as I was reading through the review again.

The two comments weren’t from senior management (read: my bosses) or even from two different people. The comments were from one person who didn’t like my management style.

Reading it years later elicited the same reaction I had the first time I saw it: some embarrassment that someone thought I wasn’t doing a good job. A bit of anger and defensiveness; I caught myself explaining why I had to be that way with this specific team member. And then I took a deep breath and stopped and noticed my reaction. Only then was I able to interrupt my habit of being defensive to instead think more clearly about what could have been done with this employee to make things better for both of us and, ultimately, the end result for our client.

I should have seen that this review gave me a new talking point when I connected with each of my team members. I could have used it as an opportunity to learn directly from them what I could be doing better to be the best manager I could be for them. I could have asked for more direct feedback from my senior management team about those two comments – specifically, what could I do differently in response to a negative comment from someone on my team.

So many questions ran through my head as I reviewed this old review. Once I got past all the negative self-talk about what didn’t work in my performance, I realized that it was partly because I was young and new at the role. This helped me create some guidance that I share with all young managers:

  • Embrace every bit of feedback – It’s not all going to be positive, and it won’t all be productive, but feedback is your opportunity to hear what someone else is saying is not working for them and try to figure out how it could be better. As you hear the feedback, notice what it tells you about what’s working and not working in your performance. Own what is yours to own – successes and challenges. Then consider how to use the information to make small gradual improvements.
  • Ask questions – As a coaching manager, ask more than tell to activate and inspire your teams. And since a big part of being a manager requires you to manage up as well as manage down, learning how to properly phrase questions to your boss(es) can actually engage them into a stronger relationship with you. Stop and notice how much of what you say is directing instead of questioning. Questions pull the other side into communication. Directing generally shuts communication down.
  • Be yourself – We’re all human, which means we’re all uniquely packaged with specific strengths, talents and liabilities that make us who we are. But depending on your specific situation, you sometimes need to manage your strengths. Remember: just because they are strengths doesn’t mean you should use them at full throttle all the time. An unmanaged strength can quickly become a performance liability. This specific team member found my attribute of being organized to be off-putting, calling me a micro-manager, yet others found it refreshing to know that we were always aware of exactly what each member of the team was responsible for. I needed to first understand why they didn’t like it, and then learn how to better work with them to encourage and inspire them in a way that worked best for them. Manage your abilities based on the needs of the situations you find yourself in.

For senior management, consider this when you have young managers:

  • Stop using performance reviews and instead have performance conversations – Help your managers develop greater skills in real time by having frequent performance conversations that review what’s working and not working with some aspect of the young manager. Period performance reviews are ineffective because they are too infrequent and too standard. Performance conversations happen in the moment, letting both parties take advantage of a performance success (that could be amplified) or performance challenge (that needs to be corrected). This creates both a strong manager relationship along with greater development opportunities, allowing the young manager to improve their skills, connection and retention.
  • Encourage dialogue – Encourage discussion and team comradery with you and your manager(s) and encourage them to create the same level of engagement with their team(s). You’re the role model for your young manager; they’re going to look to your behavior as what’s working and not working. Make sure you give them something they can replicate that will benefit everyone.

Take Action
When you feel yourself slipping into a negative reaction about something you’ve just experienced, allow yourself to recognize the emotions you’re feeling by stopping and noticing what’s happening in and around you. Then, take a deep breath and ask what you want to come from the situation and how you need to be or act to achieve this outcome.  With a clear end goal in mind, you can respond with intention to work toward that desired end goal, and often get there faster and more effectively.

By Kristin Allaben

Consider reading Managers: How to Identify and Correct Your Blind Spots

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Workplace Culture Can Make You Sharp or Dull

Look at the job description for any role in any department at your company and you’ll likely find some overlap between the core competencies.

For many organizations, these competencies, among others, dictate the culture of the organization. Individuals won’t be hired if they don’t share the same values (often aligned with core competencies) as the organization as a whole, and the HR team is required to ensure that resumes fit the bill before bringing someone in for an interview. These parameters are defined not only to find the right fit for the job, but to also find the right fit for the organization, parameters that are often initially established by senior management.

But think about who fills those roles. Do you see those core competencies accurately reflected?

Read the full article on Thrive Global: https://thriveglobal.com/stories/workplace-culture-can-make-you-sharp-or-dull/.

By Jay Forte

Consider reading Learning How to Be Self-Managed

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