Eyes are Everywhere

There’s a saying, “Dance like no one is watching.” And I love the positive message behind it – that you should be able to do what makes you happy without caring what others think. Beautiful.

But take a step back for a moment. Ask yourself: what is it I love to do that I don’t care if people see? And a follow up question: why would it matter if they see?

These are important questions for a two main reasons.

  1. Someone always sees. Think about the number of surveillance videos that are regularly shared on the news catching someone in the act of doing something. Think about the unintended audience of children who see what you do and often try to mimic it or do it themselves later.
  2. You’re not being true to you. If you’re ashamed to let others see you enjoying something you love to do, there is more work for you to do as it relates to living your true self. Are you hiding something you love to do for fear of criticism? For fear of being cast out? For fear of being made fun of? Or are you hiding something that you love to do because it’s so different from how people know you?

Consider for a moment what life would be like if you were free to be who you really are, the person who loves art, dance, rap or theatre. The person who lives for fitness, sports and competition. The person who loves to make money, share ideas or help others. What if you could know yourself and be yourself. What could your life look like?

Oftentimes, the hardest part to gaining greater clarity of oneself is making the time and the effort to tune in to oneself to see who you really are and what you really want from this one great and amazing life.

Take Action
Take a moment to tune out the world and tune in to yourself. Are you living honestly and authentically? Are you taking advantage of the strengths and talents you have to make your life exactly as you want it to be?

Consider the expectations people have for you. Are these expectations aligned to your values, goals and strengths? Or, do you find yourself making decisions to please others more than to align to who you are and how you can live your best life?

By gaining greater self-awareness, you may find that some expectations just don’t fit you any longer based on your evolution as a person; as you’ve grown, your values have changed. Be open to being who you are at this moment, and go live and be the best version of that person. In doing so, you will be happier, more confident and more capable to live who you are, with or without and audience.

By Kristin Allaben

Consider reading I Don’t Believe in an Identity Crisis

Return to the Blog

Moving in Autopilot

By Kristin Allaben, Executive Assistant & Strategic Communications Specialist

I remember the first time someone told me to “be aware.”

I was 16, sitting in my driver’s education class. My instructor played a short video, showing a driver’s view as they drove a car down several side streets and took a few turns before parking. My instructor shut off the short 15 or 20 second video and asked the class to identify the first road sign the driver passed.

I had no idea. I remember feeling stunned into awareness. I was watching the road but certainly wasn’t paying attention to the things within view of the drive, like the road signs.

This alarmed me to the things going on around me that I may be missing by moving through life in autopilot. If you are in autopilot, you will miss what’s happening around you – all the information and opportunities your world has to offer.

The next major awareness wake-up call happened for me the year after I graduated from college. Working full time and going to graduate school online at night, I had a routine. Get up, go to work, come home, go for a run, eat, go to class, go to bed. Repeat.

I vividly remember working on an assignment for one of my courses when I realized the content being taught went against what I was being taught on the job. Awareness. Enlightenment. My wake-up call. I had a moment of clarity that pointed to the fact that the program was not for me. I chose to leave the program and focus on my career instead.

If I had been moving in autopilot, focused on just getting the work done vs. being tuned in to the information I was reading, I may have missed this critical moment to decide if the degree was worth the investment (both time and money).

Moral of the story: catch yourself when you’re moving in autopilot, but don’t confuse it with routine. Routine can be healthy and help you stay focused. Though you are in routine, you are still aware and still making choices on purpose. But when you’re in autopilot, you tune out much of what’s happening around you. You do things out of habit and risk the chance of missing some of the greatest opportunities life can present to you.

Be mindful of what’s happening around you. Tune in to be aware of the opportunities that come out of every situation. Life has a funny way of surprising you. Get out of habit and autopilot. Get into being mindful, aware and ready for life’s opportunities.

 

Read Tune Out to Tune In

Return to the Blog

RSS feed
Connect with us on Facebook
Connect with us on LinkedIn